The Glenlivet

The Glenlivet, by being the first licensed distillery in the valley, set the standards in quality and taste that went on to define the Speyside style of single malt whisky: Smooth, Rich and Fruity.

The Glenlivet range

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Main markets for The Glenlivet

map-theglenlivet
  1. USA
  2. Duty Free
  3. Taiwan
  4. India
  5. Canada

The Glenlivet in short

Co-leader
of the Single Malts Category
N°1
Best Single Malt (Speyside) at the 2015 International Whisky Competition
N°1
Largest contributor to the sector's volume growth over the past five years

Know-how

The Glenlivet owes its unique taste to a number of specific factors relating to its production and location. The distillery is located in the Cairngorms National Park at over 270m above sea level. According to weather records, it is one of the coldest places in Britain characterised by strong winds and heavy snowfalls in winter. 
The water drawn from Josie’s Well, a source of hard mineral water, enables complex aromas to develop during the distillation process. The lantern-shaped stills give the spirit its outstanding balance and strong character. Lastly, a careful ageing process, using hand-selected oak casks, gives The Glenlivet its full flavour.

 

History of The Glenlivet

1824
1852
1871
1876
1884
20th century

Founded by George Smith, The Glenlivet has been crafted in the remote Livet Valley in the heart of Scotland's Speyside region since 1824. He founded the first legal distillery in the parish of Glenlivet.

In a letter to Patrick Fraser, an Edinburgh lawyer, Charles Dickens, wrote “A man in Edinburgh supposed to be unparalleled in his whisky education has just sent me (..) Rare old Glenlivet. Try the accompanying specimen, and drink some as heartily as I will drink to you.”

George Smith died in 1871, but his legacy lived on in his son and heir to the distillery, John Gordon Smith, just as much as it did in the spirit in the casks.

In 1876 John filed a request to trademark the name Glenlivet to put an end to the activities of the impostors taking advantage of the desirability of the single malt by using its name on their bottles. 

In 1884, a court ruling officially gave George Smith's single malt the exclusive right to be called The Glenlivet. 

At the start of the 20th century, The Glenlivet became the favourite whisky for enthusiasts throughout the British Empire. Following the end of Prohibition in the United States, its reputation grew in America with The Glenlivet quickly becoming the No.1 single malt in the country, a position it continues to enjoy today. 

Founded by George Smith, The Glenlivet has been crafted in the remote Livet Valley in the heart of Scotland's Speyside region since 1824. He founded the first legal distillery in the parish of Glenlivet.

In a letter to Patrick Fraser, an Edinburgh lawyer, Charles Dickens, wrote “A man in Edinburgh supposed to be unparalleled in his whisky education has just sent me (..) Rare old Glenlivet. Try the accompanying specimen, and drink some as heartily as I will drink to you.”

George Smith died in 1871, but his legacy lived on in his son and heir to the distillery, John Gordon Smith, just as much as it did in the spirit in the casks.

In 1876 John filed a request to trademark the name Glenlivet to put an end to the activities of the impostors taking advantage of the desirability of the single malt by using its name on their bottles. 

In 1884, a court ruling officially gave George Smith's single malt the exclusive right to be called The Glenlivet. 

At the start of the 20th century, The Glenlivet became the favourite whisky for enthusiasts throughout the British Empire. Following the end of Prohibition in the United States, its reputation grew in America with The Glenlivet quickly becoming the No.1 single malt in the country, a position it continues to enjoy today. 

Founded by George Smith, The Glenlivet has been crafted in the remote Livet Valley in the heart of Scotland's Speyside region since 1824. He founded the first legal distillery in the parish of Glenlivet.

In a letter to Patrick Fraser, an Edinburgh lawyer, Charles Dickens, wrote “A man in Edinburgh supposed to be unparalleled in his whisky education has just sent me (..) Rare old Glenlivet. Try the accompanying specimen, and drink some as heartily as I will drink to you.”

George Smith died in 1871, but his legacy lived on in his son and heir to the distillery, John Gordon Smith, just as much as it did in the spirit in the casks.

In 1876 John filed a request to trademark the name Glenlivet to put an end to the activities of the impostors taking advantage of the desirability of the single malt by using its name on their bottles. 

In 1884, a court ruling officially gave George Smith's single malt the exclusive right to be called The Glenlivet. 

At the start of the 20th century, The Glenlivet became the favourite whisky for enthusiasts throughout the British Empire. Following the end of Prohibition in the United States, its reputation grew in America with The Glenlivet quickly becoming the No.1 single malt in the country, a position it continues to enjoy today.