Havana Club

This iconic Cuban rum, whose authentic flavour is popular across the world, is the world's No.3 international rum brand.

Havana Club range

havana-sugarcane

Main markets for Havana Club

map-havana
  1. Cuba
  2. Germany
  3. France
  4. Italy
  5. Spain

Havana Club in short

N°3
International rum brand in the world
N°1
Super Premium rum brand
4
million cases sold worldwide

Know-how

Havana Club is produced in the purest Cuban tradition using high-quality sugarcane. The slow distillation process, carried out in columns designed especially for Havana Club, produces a strong spirit with powerful aromas known as aguardiente.
This eau-de-vie is then aged in white oak casks before being blended with a fresh sugarcane distillate to create "ron fresco" (‘fresh rum’). This rum is left to age again before being blended. This process is then repeated until the Maestros del Ron Cubano (Masters of Cuban Rum) are satisfied. The choice of cask is crucial as the wood gives the eau-de-vie a specific colour, aroma and complexity.
The entire Havana Club range is aged naturally, without any kind of artificial acceleration.

 

History of Havana Club

1492
1850
Late 19th
20th
1970's
Today

When he first set sight on Cuba on the 28th of October 1492, Christopher Columbus is said to have exclaimed it was “the most beautiful island of all”.  After its introduction onto the island, sugarcane was so perfectly suited to Cuba’s rich soils and climate that, by 1850, the country provided a third of the world’s sugar.

Sugar production and rum go hand in hand but Spain initially refused to let its colonies distil, in fear of competition for its own spirits. It was not until the second half of the 19th century, when Cuba was fighting for its independence, that a real rum industry was allowed to grow.

By the late 19th century, new technologies had arrived on the market and Cuban rum producers were early adapters of column stills. Thanks to their boundless creativity, they saw all the potential of these tools and were able to develop, with exceptional raw materials, a new style of rum, lighter and fresher but characteristically Cuban.

This new rum became the perfect partner for bartenders in the early 20th century, when Cubans discovered mixology. With prohibition, American tourists came to Havana in large numbers and made the international reputation of local bartenders, called Cantineros.

In the early 1970’s, Cuba decided to choose Havana Club to represent the island and export the best Cuban Rums. A new logo was created, symbolizing the sun that shines on the island and makes its rum so rich, the warmth of the Cuban people and the Giraldilla, the emblem of the city of Havana and its free spirit.

The Cantineros developed their own cocktail style and turned towards Cuban rums such as Havana Club to create classics like the Daiquiri, the Mojito, the Presidente or the Cuba Libre. To this day, Cuban cocktails made with Cuban rums remain some of the world’s favourite tipples. 

When he first set sight on Cuba on the 28th of October 1492, Christopher Columbus is said to have exclaimed it was “the most beautiful island of all”.  After its introduction onto the island, sugarcane was so perfectly suited to Cuba’s rich soils and climate that, by 1850, the country provided a third of the world’s sugar.

Sugar production and rum go hand in hand but Spain initially refused to let its colonies distil, in fear of competition for its own spirits. It was not until the second half of the 19th century, when Cuba was fighting for its independence, that a real rum industry was allowed to grow.

By the late 19th century, new technologies had arrived on the market and Cuban rum producers were early adapters of column stills. Thanks to their boundless creativity, they saw all the potential of these tools and were able to develop, with exceptional raw materials, a new style of rum, lighter and fresher but characteristically Cuban.

This new rum became the perfect partner for bartenders in the early 20th century, when Cubans discovered mixology. With prohibition, American tourists came to Havana in large numbers and made the international reputation of local bartenders, called Cantineros.

In the early 1970’s, Cuba decided to choose Havana Club to represent the island and export the best Cuban Rums. A new logo was created, symbolizing the sun that shines on the island and makes its rum so rich, the warmth of the Cuban people and the Giraldilla, the emblem of the city of Havana and its free spirit.

The Cantineros developed their own cocktail style and turned towards Cuban rums such as Havana Club to create classics like the Daiquiri, the Mojito, the Presidente or the Cuba Libre. To this day, Cuban cocktails made with Cuban rums remain some of the world’s favourite tipples. 

When he first set sight on Cuba on the 28th of October 1492, Christopher Columbus is said to have exclaimed it was “the most beautiful island of all”.  After its introduction onto the island, sugarcane was so perfectly suited to Cuba’s rich soils and climate that, by 1850, the country provided a third of the world’s sugar.

Sugar production and rum go hand in hand but Spain initially refused to let its colonies distil, in fear of competition for its own spirits. It was not until the second half of the 19th century, when Cuba was fighting for its independence, that a real rum industry was allowed to grow.

By the late 19th century, new technologies had arrived on the market and Cuban rum producers were early adapters of column stills. Thanks to their boundless creativity, they saw all the potential of these tools and were able to develop, with exceptional raw materials, a new style of rum, lighter and fresher but characteristically Cuban.

This new rum became the perfect partner for bartenders in the early 20th century, when Cubans discovered mixology. With prohibition, American tourists came to Havana in large numbers and made the international reputation of local bartenders, called Cantineros.

In the early 1970’s, Cuba decided to choose Havana Club to represent the island and export the best Cuban Rums. A new logo was created, symbolizing the sun that shines on the island and makes its rum so rich, the warmth of the Cuban people and the Giraldilla, the emblem of the city of Havana and its free spirit.

The Cantineros developed their own cocktail style and turned towards Cuban rums such as Havana Club to create classics like the Daiquiri, the Mojito, the Presidente or the Cuba Libre. To this day, Cuban cocktails made with Cuban rums remain some of the world’s favourite tipples. 

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