Havana Club

This iconic Cuban rum, whose authentic flavour is popular across the world, is the world's No.3 international rum brand.

Havana Club range

Main markets for Havana Club

  1. Cuba
  2. Germany
  3. France
  4. Italy
  5. Spain

Havana Club in short

No.3
International rum brand in the world
4
million cases sold worldwide

Havana Club news

There is no news linked to this brand!

Know-how

Havana Club is produced in the purest Cuban tradition using high-quality sugarcane. The slow distillation process, carried out in columns designed especially for Havana Club, produces a strong spirit with powerful aromas known as aguardiente.

 

History of Havana Club

1492
1850
Late 19th
Today

When he first set sight on Cuba on the 28th of October 1492, Christopher Columbus is said to have exclaimed it was “the most beautiful island of all”.  After its introduction onto the island, sugarcane was so perfectly suited to Cuba’s rich soils and climate that, by 1850, the country provided a third of the world’s sugar.

Sugar production and rum go hand in hand but Spain initially refused to let its colonies distil, in fear of competition for its own spirits. It was not until the second half of the 19th century, when Cuba was fighting for its independence, that a real rum industry was allowed to grow.

By the late 19th century, new technologies had arrived on the market and Cuban rum producers were early adapters of column stills. Thanks to their boundless creativity, they saw all the potential of these tools and were able to develop, with exceptional raw materials, a new style of rum, lighter and fresher but characteristically Cuban.

The Cantineros developed their own cocktail style and turned towards Cuban rums such as Havana Club to create classics like the Daiquiri, the Mojito, the Presidente or the Cuba Libre. To this day, Cuban cocktails made with Cuban rums remain some of the world’s favourite tipples. 

When he first set sight on Cuba on the 28th of October 1492, Christopher Columbus is said to have exclaimed it was “the most beautiful island of all”.  After its introduction onto the island, sugarcane was so perfectly suited to Cuba’s rich soils and climate that, by 1850, the country provided a third of the world’s sugar.

Sugar production and rum go hand in hand but Spain initially refused to let its colonies distil, in fear of competition for its own spirits. It was not until the second half of the 19th century, when Cuba was fighting for its independence, that a real rum industry was allowed to grow.

By the late 19th century, new technologies had arrived on the market and Cuban rum producers were early adapters of column stills. Thanks to their boundless creativity, they saw all the potential of these tools and were able to develop, with exceptional raw materials, a new style of rum, lighter and fresher but characteristically Cuban.

The Cantineros developed their own cocktail style and turned towards Cuban rums such as Havana Club to create classics like the Daiquiri, the Mojito, the Presidente or the Cuba Libre. To this day, Cuban cocktails made with Cuban rums remain some of the world’s favourite tipples. 

When he first set sight on Cuba on the 28th of October 1492, Christopher Columbus is said to have exclaimed it was “the most beautiful island of all”.  After its introduction onto the island, sugarcane was so perfectly suited to Cuba’s rich soils and climate that, by 1850, the country provided a third of the world’s sugar.

Sugar production and rum go hand in hand but Spain initially refused to let its colonies distil, in fear of competition for its own spirits. It was not until the second half of the 19th century, when Cuba was fighting for its independence, that a real rum industry was allowed to grow.

By the late 19th century, new technologies had arrived on the market and Cuban rum producers were early adapters of column stills. Thanks to their boundless creativity, they saw all the potential of these tools and were able to develop, with exceptional raw materials, a new style of rum, lighter and fresher but characteristically Cuban.

The Cantineros developed their own cocktail style and turned towards Cuban rums such as Havana Club to create classics like the Daiquiri, the Mojito, the Presidente or the Cuba Libre. To this day, Cuban cocktails made with Cuban rums remain some of the world’s favourite tipples.